Writing parameterized Tests with Spring and JUnit 4

This blog will demonstrate how to write parameterized tests with JUnit4 with Spring.

Let say we have the following interface

public interface Logic {
     boolean xor(boolean a, boolean b);

and the corresponding implementation annotated as a Spring service component

public class LogicImpl implements Logic {
      public boolean xor(boolean a, boolean b) {
            return a ^ b;

To test the above class with different input combinations of arguments a and b, we can write the following parameterized test in JUnit

@RunWith(Parameterized.class) // Note 1
@SpringApplicationConfiguration(classes = BlogApplication.class)
public class LogicImplTest {

     private LogicImpl logic;

     // Manually config for spring to use Parameterised
     private TestContextManager testContextManager;

     @Parameter(value = 0) // Note 3i
     public boolean a;

     @Parameter(value = 1) // Note 3ii
     public boolean b;

     @Parameter(value = 2) // Note 3iii
     public boolean expected;

     @Parameters // Note 4
     public static Collection<Object[]> data() {
          Collection<Object[]> params = new ArrayList<>();
          params.add(new Object[] { true, true, false});
          params.add(new Object[] { true, false, true});
          params.add(new Object[] { false, true, true});
          params.add(new Object[] { false, false, false});

          return params;

     @Before // Note 2
     public void setUp() throws Exception {
          this.testContextManager = new TestContextManager(getClass());

     @Test // Note 5
     public void testXor() {
          assertThat(logic.xor(a, b), equalTo(expected));


A few things to note here:

  1. The test class is to be run with the Parameterized runner, instead of the normal SpringJUnit4ClassRunner class.
  2. We need to manually configure the test context manager as in the @Before method. This is typically done automatically by Spring
  3. Parameters are defined as public members of the class (as in 3i to 3iii) with the @Parameter annotation. Since we have more than 1 parameter, it is also neccessary to set the value attribute. This defines the index of the parameters to use.
  4. Parameter values are set by implementing a static  method and annotate it with @Parameters. In our example, the data() method returns a list of object arrays. Each value of the list params corresponds to a set of parameter values.
  5.  Tests now can use the parameter values.

Running the test class in Eclipse will give you something like this


Note testXor() is run 4 times, each using the parameter set of the values defined in the list returned by the data() method.


About Raymond Lee
Professional Java/EE Developer, software development technology enthusiast.

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